Heroin is a rollercoaster ride to nowhere. Using the drug is the highest of highs, while heroin withdrawal symptoms are the lowest of lows. Whether it’s your first attempt at detox or you’ve gone through the process more than once, physical symptoms of heroin withdrawal are hard to get through. Understanding symptoms of heroin withdrawal makes the process easier.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms Feel Like a Terrible Flu

Man Going Through Heroin Withdrawal SymptomsHeroin withdrawal symptoms are never something you set out in life to experience. These ill feelings are a consequence of heroin addiction. Using this powerful opiate drug changes your brain chemistry and causes physical tolerance to heroin. Your body and brain are really quite incredible, as they are trying to work with the drug you keep putting into your system.

Physical tolerance is your brain’s attempt to keep you alive despite the damage you are inflicting by using heroin. But just like changes are made to adjust to your drug use, changes must also be made to readjust to normal life without heroin. These readjustments cause the ill feelings of heroin withdrawal.

Anyone going through heroin withdrawal symptoms knows they feel a lot like you’re dying or a terrible case of the flu. But you aren’t dying. These symptoms are rarely fatal. They’re at their worst between 48–72 hours after your last dose and slowly improve from there.

Physical Symptoms of Heroin Withdrawal

There are a wide variety of physical symptoms of heroin withdrawal. These symptoms vary according to your drug history, typical dose, personal health history, underlying mental conditions, genetics, weight, age, and gender. If you use other substances like cocaine or alcohol with heroin, you can suffer more dramatic and varied symptoms, too.

The typical physical symptoms of withdrawal from heroin include:

  • Insomnia
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Cold flashes
  • Sweating
  • Involuntary kicking movements
  • Bone pain

Getting the Right Treatment Helps

During professional heroin withdrawal treatment, your heroin detox will not be unbearable. Professionals in drug and alcohol addiction treatment know how to help you get through heroin withdrawal comfortably, safely, and securely. One of the biggest risks of heroin withdrawal is a deadly relapse. Heroin overdose is common when people relapse during any phase of detox or early recovery.

Through professional rehab treatment, addiction specialists help you understand your journey, provide medications to improve your worst symptoms and ensure you are comfortable and as healthy as possible. Detox is one of the hardest parts of early recovery. However, it’s only the first part of a long road to lasting recovery. You need the right professionals by your side for your strongest chance of a better, sober future.

Supportive professionals aren’t the only ones helping you along your journey to wellness. Your peers in recovery are also important, providing healthy support for you, just as you do for them. You gain this support in the residential or intensive outpatient treatment environment. Group therapies also encourage these close, lasting bonds.

Heroin Addiction Treatment in Southern California

Serenity Lodge in Southern California provides heroin rehab for people just like you from all over Southern California, the rest of the United States and Canada. Programs of Serenity Lodge include gender-specific residential and intensive outpatient treatment in an amenity-rich environment. These amenities foster relaxation, just as the outdoor environment encourages the serenity you need to focus on your personal needs and goals.

Amenities of Serenity Lodge include:

  • Professional recording studio
  • Private movie theatre
  • 1,500 square foot fitness therapy gym
  • Swimming pool, hot tub, and sauna
  • Golf and racquetball
  • Meditation and nutritional, prepared meals

If you or someone you love suffers from heroin addiction, the right treatment can help you gain lasting sobriety you need for a better life. Call Serenity Lodge now at 866-379-4365 for information about available programs for addictions.