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Molly is just one of the names for the drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which is also known as MDMA or ecstasy. While Molly is widely known as a club drug, recreational use can quickly turn to addiction. Explore the many negative Molly drug effects, and take a closer look at how to overcome a drug addiction.

High Blood Pressure and Heart Rate

Even in Small Doses, Molly Drug Effects Can Be DangerousExperts define Molly as a stimulant. However individuals consume it, the drug will increase their heart rates. Although many people take Molly in order to feel energetic, that increase in short-term energy comes at a price.

Using Molly can increase your heart rate and blood pressure. It also decreases the heart’s efficiency. Pumping blood requires more effort, and that issue only gets worse the more Molly you take.

While this can be a serious issue for all users, it’s a particular problem for those with cardiac issues. If you have an abnormal heart rate or already high blood pressure, then using Molly could worsen your condition quickly.

Involuntary Jaw Clenching

One of the common Molly drug effects is involuntary jaw clenching. The majority of people who use Molly experience this and consider it to be a part of the process. However, there’s nothing natural or normal about involuntary jaw clenching for extended periods of time.

This side effect can impact your health and comfort long after the Molly wears off. A lot of people have a stiff or sore jaw or deal with TMJ in the days to come. It can also cause dry mouth, which may lead to an increase in cavities or dental problems in the future.

Temperature Regulation Issues

One of the most dangerous effects of using Molly is how the drug can impact your ability to regulate temperature. This is made worse by the fact that so many users take Molly in hot environments where they’re also moving vigorously. Taking Molly at an outdoor festival or an indoor concert, for example, just makes the side effects worse.

Molly can lead to hyperthermia where the body is too warm and can’t cool down properly. This can cause dangerous side effects, including electrolyte imbalance or muscle breakdown. Since the body also tends to retain water while using MDMA, it could even cause swelling in the brain.

Digestive Issues

Compared to the worrying temperature regulation issues, digestive concerns may not seem like a major issue. However, they certainly make the process very uncomfortable. Taking Molly disrupts the entire gastrointestinal system in a variety of ways.

To start, many people experience nausea while under the influence of Molly. It can also cause you to feel thirsty but have no appetite. Many people also experience diarrhea both during and after using Molly.

Since Molly decreases your appetite, weight loss is also likely. Rapid muscle loss is most common. Additionally, extended use can lead to malnutrition.

Risk of Overdose or Addiction

Molly drug effects aren’t just short term. Using the drug can cause severe and long-term effects. Every time you use Molly, you’re putting yourself at risk of an overdose. Seizures or a total lack of consciousness are possible if you take too much Molly or combine it with other substances like alcohol.

There’s also the risk of developing an addiction. While the signs of addiction vary, you may be dependent if you’re focused on obtaining and using the drug. Addictions can be devastating and have financial, personal, psychological, and physical side effects.

Say Goodbye to Molly Drug Effects for Good

The good news is that an addiction to Molly doesn’t have to be permanent. At Serenity Lodge, Men can get the treatment they need to overcome addiction. Our caring, compassionate, and comprehensive addiction recovery rehab may include all of the following strategies and methods:

If you or someone you love is addicted to Molly, then it’s time to get help. At Serenity Lodge in Lake Arrowhead, California, you can access the support you need for lasting recovery. Find health, happiness, and fulfillment today by calling (855) 932-4045.